By JESSICA WEINBERG

When it comes to working out many of us head to SoulCycle, Barry’s Bootcamp, and Rumble to work up a sweat with dimmed lights and music blasting. Let’s be honest: it doesn’t hurt that you can post an Instagram of your new workout outfit and Snapchats of the celebrities in your class.

When it comes to working out many of us head to SoulCycle, Barry’s Bootcamp, and Rumble to work up a sweat with dimmed lights and music blasting. Let’s be honest: it doesn’t hurt that you can post an Instagram of your new workout outfit and Snapchats of the celebrities in your class.

While these classes are a fun way for people to get in shape they can be pricy. Ranging from $34 to $40 per session, the classes are out of reach for most college students more than once a week.

NYU junior and avid SoulCycle fan Jenny Kleiman, said if classes were not so expensive she would go more often. “They are a great way to feel like you aren’t working out when you really are, but over $60 per week on classes is a lot,” she said. And they are time consuming beyond the 45 minutes of working out, often stretching to an hour and 15 minutes. “I have to get there 15 minutes early to check in, get spin shoes, put my things away, etc. and after it is survival of the fittest to get to the lockers.

ACE certified personal trainer Miriam Fried shares tips for staying in shape without breaking the bank and saving time.

  1. Balance is key.

Staying fit does not require a daily intense workout. Fried recommends intense workouts three to four days a week, and on off days just walking or stretching. “This is especially important if you are a student who sits sedentary in class most of the day!”

  1. No gym membership required.

Everything you need to jumpstart a healthy lifestyle is online with free workout programs and information on diet and exercise. Muscle and Fitness has a section on their website where you can find workouts based on your skill level, workout type, and desired area of focus. Some sites Fried recommends are A Workout Routine and Bodybuilding.com.

  1. The cardio myth.

Many of us believe that cardio is your best friend. While cardio will burn more calories minute for minute, Fried said, it is not high on her list of workouts that will create long-lasting changes. “Full body, higher intensity workouts will give you more bang for your buck by hitting the majority of the major muscle groups,” Fried said. Her full body workout checklist includes at least one leg movement (squat or deadlift), pulling movement (row or pullup), pushing movement (push up or shoulder press), and a core exercise (plank or leg raise).

  1. Short and sweet.

If you can set aside 30 minutes that is enough, Fried said, to do a full body workout that focuses on compound exercises, which involve multiple joints and muscle groups, such as squats, deadlifts, presses, rows, and pull ups.

  1. Think of your workout as a meal.

There are many components to a good workout. Fried said, “I usually tell my clients to look at their workouts as a meal.  Your big compound exercises should be your meat and potatoes, while your isolation and smaller exercises are your side dishes. Then, you sprinkle cardio in as needed for seasoning and flavor!”

  1. Workout anywhere.

If you have weights and resistance bands you can take those outside to change it up. Go to the closest park and tie your resistance bands around the side of a bench. Just like that you have a new spot to do your workout. Even if you do not have equipment, she said, there are other things you can do outside or just in the comfort of your own home. “Bodyweight exercises like push-ups, lunges and squats can be done anywhere as can plyometrics like burpees and jump squats to get your heart rate up and isometric holds like planks and wall sits,” Fried said.